Holiday Card Making Station Ideas

img_3410A card making station is a great way to inspire open-ended exploration and creativity while encouraging fine motor development, as well as early reading and writing skills. Prior to introducing the children to the station, gather up materials that you have on hand and set it up all in one place that can be left for several days (or weeks). Aim to make the materials all items that the children can use independently, so they can create on their own without much adult help. If you leave the card making station set up over time, occasionally swing by when not in use to tidy up and add one or two new tools or materials to keep the area inviting and sparking new ideas. As you add new supplies, take some of the other items away. Make sure that the area doesn’t become cluttered or children will feel overwhelmed by the choices and may find it harder to create.

 

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General materials to start with:

Pre-folded blank cards (made from card stock or construction paper)

Envelopes that fit the size of cards available

Clear tape on a dispenser

Colored masking tape or painters tape

Hole Punch

Kid scissors

Markers or crayons

Glue stick or white glue

Name cards (on index cards write the names of family and friends for the children to copy)

Word wall (write down holiday words that children might like to copy: Merry Christmas/ To:  From:  / Love)

Materials or tools to add to keep the station interesting:

Colored copy paper or construction paper

Decorative paper punches

Decorative scissors (“Crazy Scissors” is what my students call them)

Do-a-Dot markers (careful since these can stain)

Foam shapes (to glue on)

Gel pens on black paper

Gift tag stickers or Paper gift tags and string

Glitter (if you’re brave)

Glitter glue

Holiday scrap booking paper

Holiday stickers

Photographs

Recycled cards from last year – cut out interesting pictures and collage

Recycled cards with hole punches on the edges & yarn to lace

Ribbon

Rubber stamps and stamp pads

Stamp markers

Tissue paper (pre-cut into squares for younger children)

White crayons on dark blue paper

For older preschoolers:

Stapler

Washable paint

Watercolor paints

Wrapping paper and clear tape

Open-ended craft supplies (transform the card making station into a ornament/gift making)

Beads

Bows

Buttons

Card stock

Cookie cutters (dip into paint and stamp / use to trace onto cards)

Curling ribbon

Gem stickers

Hemp twine

Pipe cleaners

Pom Poms

Popsicle sticks

Ribbon

Sequins

Stickers

Wiggly eyes

Wooden beads

Yarn

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Rabbit Hole

IMG_6614It’s so easy to log onto the computer in search of something, but fall into a never ending rabbit hole. I find this especially to be the case when I go looking for a new idea for my classroom. The eye candy of Pinterest, the thoughtful words of a teacher blog, and the quality resources on NAEYC are often the three main destinations of my rabbit hole journeys. {Oh wait…something on Facebook caught my eye, who just posted this funny video of two toddlers stealing each other pacifiers?}

I often start off on the path with a specific goal in mind (hmmm…how could I make my daily calendar time more child centered), but then I get sidetracked by other brilliant ideas, interesting looking activities, and delicious looking recipes. I change direction many times during one of these (near daily) rabbit hole adventures. I end up somewhere I didn’t know that I was headed, somewhere unexpected, and most often, somewhere inspiring. Quite often I never really fulfill the goal of my original quest before I realize it’s time to log off and rejoin reality. {You know, like make a real dinner for the family instead of pinning scrumptious desserts.}This of course means that tomorrow, I have reason to go back again to seek my answer. Luckily this meandering path often turns out to be more productive than a quick answer to my initial question since my discoveries often inspire my teaching, and give me new questions to ponder on my journey to be a be a lifelong learner.

Often on these serendipitous excursions, I yearn to create and share content on the web myself. As a way to share my voice, my experiences, and my passions, I often wish I had enough time to maintain my own website. In fact, if I reigned in my time on my journeys, I could create the time to write and publish. Perhaps this is the year that I commit to writing a weekly blog, so others might reach my thoughts along their own journeys. In fact, if you are reading this, you likely set out seeking an answer and found your way here!

 

 

Gardening All Year: The Circle Widens

IMG_2586This week I had the fine pleasure of being a presenter in Sally of Fairy Dust Teaching’s 2016 Summer Early Childhood Online Conference. What an honor it is to be a presenter with such a rich and knowledgeable group of educators. I am humbled, and honored for the many comments that were shared after folks watched my e-course.

I feel like my circle of friends has widened, and I am eager to share resources with everyone. My blog is in it’s sapling stage, but I hope that you check back.
I will set up my opt-in this weekend, and by subscribing to my newsletter, I will share a big packet of ideas (more than what was in the slide show) to get you “gardening all year” with your children.

Thanks again for stopping by!

April

 

For more information about the 2016 Summer Early Childhood Conference click here:

Summer Conference

 

For the love of fiddle heads…

imageThere is something magical about fiddleheads. That first sprouting of life. Vibrant green and spiraling. My children love to forage for fiddle heads in the forest on our land. It’s a sure sign that spring really is happening…which is a long and patience testing process in northern Vermont.

This year’s harvest was gathered by my children and enjoyed at several meals this week. It’s wonderful to see my children’s delight in brining home something they’ve wild crafted on their own, and even more delightful to watch them devour a food that many would find “too earthy”.

The joy of feasting on natures bounty with my family fills my heart. ❤️

Children’s Books to Inspire Gardening

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Little bitty plants for our patio planters…but oh how they grow all summer!

 

Books about Gardening, Vegetables & Plants:

Corn is Maize by Aliki

Eating the Alphabet – Lois Ehlert

Food Alphabet by David Drew

From Eye to Potato (Scholastic News Nonfiction Readers: How Things Grow)

How Are You Peeling? By Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers

How Does your Garden Grow? (Little Golden Book)

Inch by Inch – The Garden Song by David Mallet

Jack’s Garden by Henry Cole

Mr. Hobson’s Garden by Marc Gave

Nuts About Nuts by Diane Wilmer and Paul Dowling

Over in the Garden by Jennifer Ward (insects)

Plants by Terry Jennings

The Popcorn Book by Tomie de Paola

The Surprise Garden by Zoe Hall

Tops & Bottoms by Janet Stevens

Vegetables in the Garden – A First Discovery Book

 

Books about Flowers:  

Flowers: A First Discovery Book

How to Grow a Sunflower by S. Karavis and G. Matthews

It’s Science! Plants and Flowers

Let’s Look at Flowers

Sunflower House by Eve Buntin

The Reason for a Flower by R. Hellert

 

Books about plant parts:

Flowers/Fruits/Leaves/Roots/Seeds/Stems by Vijaya Khisty Bodach

Books about Beans:  

Growing Beans by Peter & Sheryl Sloan (uses egg shells)

One Bean by Anne Rockwell

Scarlette Beane by K. Wallace

 

Books about Seeds:

A Fruit is a Suitcase for Seeds by J. Richards

A Seed is Sleepy by D. H. Aston

From Seed to Plant by Allan Fowler

From Seed to Pumpkin by W. Pfeffer

How a Seed Grows by H. Jordan

I’m a Seed by J. Marzollo (compares pumpkin to marigolds)

Just a Seed by W. Blaxland

Oh Say Can You Seed? All About Flowering Plants by B. Worth

One Little Seed by E. Greenstein

Seeds Like These by Paki Carter

Spring is Here! A Story About Seeds by Joan Holub

The Carrot Seed by R. Krauss

The Surprise Garden by Zoe Hall

The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle

We Plant a Seed (Troll First Start Science)

 

 

Books about Fruit:  

Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey

Each Orange Had 8 Slices by Paul Giganti

Fruit – A First Discovery Book.

Orange Juice by B. Chessen, P. Chanko

 

Check out my Pinterest board for more ideas for gardening with children:

Gardening Book for Teachers

This booklist contain my favorite ‘grown-up’ books for learning about gardening with children. In another post I will share my favorite children’s books!

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Bucklin-Sporer, Arden. (2010). How to Grow a School Garden: A Complete Guide for Parents and Teachers.

Dannenmaier, Molly. (1998). A Childs Garden: Enchanting Outdoor Spaces for Children and Parents

James, Cathy. (2015). The Garden Classroom: Hands-on Activities in Math, Science, Literacy, and Art.

Kiefer, J. & M. Kemple. (1998). Digging Deeper: Integrating Youth Gardens into Schools and Communities.

Lovejoy, Sharon. (2015). Camp Granny.

Lovejoy, Sharon. (1999). Roots, Shoots, Buckets and Boots: Gardening Together with Children.

Moore, R. (1993). Plants for Play: A Plant Selection Guide for Children’s Outdoor Environments.

Morris, Karyn. (2000). The Kids Can Press Jumbo Book of Gardening

Tierra, Lesley. (2000). Kid’s Herb Book: For Children of All Ages.

Richardson, Beth. (1998). Gardening with Children

Rushing, Felder. (1999). Junior Garden Book- Better Homes and Gardens Books

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Check out my Pinterest board for more information about gardening with children: